Director:

Gilbert Barrantes

gbarrantes59@yahoo.com

Research interests:

Ornithology and animal behavior.


Daniel Briceño

rbriceno@biologia.ucr.ac.cr

Research interests:

Master en Biología con especialidad en Entomología de la Escuela de Biología de la Universidad de Costa Rica, y un posgrado del Instituto de Zoología y Fisiología de la Universidad Libre de Berlín en 1989. Profesor Catedrático de la Escuela de Biología desde el año 2005 e investigador de la Escuela de Biología desde 1992. SubDirector de la Escuela de Biología de la Universidad de Costa Rica durante el periodo 1999-2001 y Director de la Escuela de Biología desde el 2001 al 2005. Sus grupos de interés son los insectos y las arañas en aspectos relacionados con comportamiento reproductivo, selección sexual, comunicación y ecología del comportamiento.


Marcelo Araya Salas

marceloa27@gmail.com

Research interests:

Bird species with a high learning degree in their vocalizations follow cultural evolution processes similar to genetic evolution. I am interested in the processes of cultural evolution and the mechanisms which have generated the current song types. I am also interested in understanding the role of mating systems in the cultural evolution of songs. My current research project describes the geographic variation and possible paths of cultural evolution in the song of Nightingale Wrens.


José A. Salazar Zúñiga

jsalazar@veraguarainforest.com

Research interests:

Currently my interest is based on studying the behavior of amphibians, using bioacoustics to have a better understanding of the interpretation of the vocalizations in different situations such as courtship, aggression, territoriality, etc. In addition I am studying the inter-population variations that exist in the songs of different species and the effect it causes in their behavior.


Luis Esteban Vargas

luissum@gmail.com

Research interests:

My research interests are birdsong learning and repertoire plasticity in adult individuals, as well as vocal adaptations in response to processes of sexual selection and territorial behavior. I mainly have studied Clay-colored Thrushes, Turdus grayi, and White-breasted Wood-wrens, Henicorhina leucosticta, as model research spp. I also collaborate with the Osa Recording Project, which promotes biodiversity conservation of the Osa Peninsula through natural sounds recordings.


Andrés Camacho

andrescama@yahoo.com

Research interests:

My main research interest is the evolution of bird vocalizations, mainly in the context of sexual selection. I’m also interested in the effects of vicariance and habitat adaptation on song divergence. I’m doing my master’s thesis about cultural evolution of the song of a highland endemic bird in Costa Rica (Thryorchilus browni).


Luis Sandolval

biosandoval@hotmail.com

Research interests:

My research is varied and focuses firstly in understand the song characteristics that influence the sexual selection, location variation and the speciation, especially birds. Actually I study no Passeriformes species such as quails and nighthawks to try to answer these questions.


Adrián García-Rodríguez

garciar.adrian@gmail.com

Research interests:

I am interested in assessing the weight that interpopulational call variations has in the process of speciation of frogs. My current research focuses on dink frogs (Diasporus) whose taxonomy requires an exhaustive review given the potential existence of several cryptic species masked within the same taxon. Other research interests: biogeography, ecological niche models and Conservation.


Ignacio Escalante

nachoescalante@gmail.com

Research interests:

Variation in acoustic behaviour according the stage of the breeding cycle, as well as off it. Interaction between environmental noise (rivers, highways, human activities) and sounds emitted by birds, and the possible mechanisms to avoid such interference. Individual vocal variation in non-passerine birds according the influence of other singing neighbords. Other research interests: Natural history and reproductive biology of Neotropical birds. Feeding behaviour ontogeny in spiders.